Essay number 10 of the federalist

Government Essay In perhaps the greatest installment of the federalist papers, James Madison describes how factions, which work against the interest of the public, can be controlled through a constitutional government. Factions are defined by Madison as groups of people that gather together to promote their own economic interests and political opinions gradesaver. These factions often work against each other, and infringe upon the rights of others. Most people are concerned with the instability that rival factions can cause.

Essay number 10 of the federalist

Preamble to the U. Constitution Prior to the Constitution, the thirteen states were bound together by the Articles of Confederation.

These were in essence a military alliance between sovereign nations adopted to better fight the Revolutionary War.

Essay number 10 of the federalist

Congress had no power to tax, and as a result was not able to pay debts resulting from the Revolution. Madison, George WashingtonBenjamin Franklin and others feared a break-up of the union and national bankruptcy. In this view, Shays' Rebellionan armed uprising in Massachusetts inwas simply one, albeit extreme, example of "democratic excess" in the aftermath of the War.

Madison believed that the problem was not with the Articles, but rather the state legislatures, and so the solution was not to fix the articles but to restrain the excesses of the states.

The principal questions before the convention became whether the states should remain sovereign, whether sovereignty should be transferred to the national government, or whether a settlement should rest somewhere in between. Madison's nationalist position shifted the debate increasingly away from a position of pure state sovereignty, and toward the compromise.

Federalist essay number 10

By its own Article Seventhe constitution drafted by the convention needed ratification by at least nine of the thirteen states, through special conventions held in each state. Anti-Federalist writers began to publish essays and letters arguing against ratification, [7] and Alexander Hamilton recruited James Madison and John Jay to write a series of pro-ratification letters in response.

It was first printed in the Daily Advertiser under the name adopted by the Federalist writers, "Publius"; in this it was remarkable among the essays of Publius, as almost all of them first appeared in one of two other papers: On November 23, it appeared in the Packet and the next day in the Independent Journal.

Outside New York City, it made four appearances in early Though this number of reprintings was typical for The Federalist essays, many other essays, both Federalist and Anti-Federalist, saw much wider distribution. McLean announced that they would publish the first 36 of the essays in a single volume.

This volume, titled The Federalist, was released on March 2, George Hopkins' edition revealed that Madison, Hamilton, and Jay were the authors of the series, with two later printings dividing the work by author.

InJames Gideon published a third edition containing corrections by Madison, who by that time had completed his two terms as President of the United States. Dawson's edition of sought to collect the original newspaper articles, though he did not always find the first instance.

It was much reprinted, albeit without his introduction.

Essay number 10 of the federalist

The first date of publication and the newspaper name were recorded for each essay. Of modern editions, Jacob E. Cooke's edition is seen as authoritative, and is most used today. Hamilton there addressed the destructive role of a faction in breaking apart the republic.

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The question Madison answers, then, is how to eliminate the negative effects of faction. Madison defines a faction as "a number of citizens, whether amounting to a minority or majority of the whole, who are united and actuated by some common impulse of passion, or of interest, adverse to the rights of other citizens, or to the permanent and aggregate interests of the community".

At the heart of Madison's fears about factions was the unequal distribution of property in society. Ultimately, "the most common and durable source of factions has been the various and unequal distribution of property," Madison argues Dawsonp.

Since some people owned property and others owned none, Madison felt that people would form different factions that pursued different interests. Providing some examples of the distinct interests, Madison identified a landed interest, a manufacturing interest, a mercantile interest, a moneyed interest, and "many lesser interests" Dawsonp.

They all belonged to "different classes" that were "actuated by different sentiments and views," Madison insists Dawsonp. In other words, Madison argued that the unequal distribution of property led to the creation of different classes that formed different factions and pursued different class interests.

Moreover, Madison feared the formation of a certain kind of faction.

Federalist No. 10 - Wikipedia

Recognizing that the country's wealthiest property owners formed a minority and that the country's unpropertied classes formed a majority, Madison feared that the unpropertied classes would come together to form a majority faction that gained control of the government.

Against "the minor party," there could emerge "an interested and overbearing majority," Madison warns Dawsonp.The Federalist Papers were a series of essays published in newspapers in and by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay to promote the ratification of the Constitution.

The Federalist Papers, were a series of 85 essays written by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison between October and May 10 October Government Essay In perhaps the greatest installment of the federalist papers, James Madison describes how factions, which work against the interest of the public, can be controlled through a constitutional government.

This is mentioned in the Federalist paper number 10 where it says “the diversity in the faculties of men, from which the rights of property originate, is not less an insuperable obstacle to a uniformity of interests. Federalist No.

10 is an essay written by James Madison as the tenth of The Federalist Papers: a series of essays initiated by Alexander Hamilton arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution. In essay number 10 of The Federalist, James Madison challenged the Antifederalist conviction that republican government had to be small-scale.

Under the Articles of Confederation, to derive revenue to finance the war each state was to contribute to the common treasury. Federalist Number 10 Essay James Madison’s famous paper, Federalist Number 10, defends the ratification of the Constitution by sustaining the ideas of Locke, Rousseau, and Montesquieu, and contrasting with the initiatives of Voltaire.

SparkNotes: The Federalist Papers (): Federalist Essays No - No